You said it, sister

From Gawker, The Plight of Print’s Lucky Ones:

Admittedly, complaining about your well-paying job at a time when a lot of very capable people are out of work altogether won’t engender any sympathy. But Q’s little booze-soaked soliloquy does raise a question that seems to weigh heavily on the minds of media folk of a certain demographic these days (those over the age of, say, 27, who have already spent 5-plus years toiling in the trenches at publications that are vastly different in scope and size than when they started). Namely: Where do we go from here?

Because right now, as the Summer of 2009 gives way to fall, the answer is pretty damn unclear.

The whole post is well worth a read, as it captures the broad industry wide malaise that’s got a strangle hold on this certain generation of journalists, those too young to call it quits on a career but not young enough to avoid wading into this swirling pool in the first place. I am, by the way, exactly 27.

I differ from the author of this post and from other woe-begotten journos in an important way: Even if I knew what was going to happen to the industry, I still don’t think that would have caused me to change majors in college or pursue another career path after graduation. But I would have probably went about it another way (and would have hoped my j school was on board). I also probably would have taken that interview I had for an internship at Washingtonpost.com a little bit more seriously.

I mean, they had a room full of free sodas in the office. That was a big selling point for them at the time. Who would’ve known that’s where the serious shit was happening?*

*we all should have known

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4 responses to “You said it, sister

  1. I bailed at 26. Grieved for years.

  2. did I write this? did a doppelganger of mine write this? it’s exactly what I think every day.

  3. I had an internship interview with washingtonpost.com. I can’t quite remember what happened with that. I think it may have been that Parsons or Goldstein or someone made me an editor, and I decided against taking it. I remember they handed out those .com internships like club pamphlets.

  4. Woah, woah, woah. The print industry is doing what now?

    Seriously, though, with all of these journalists out of print, where the hell will they go? I only hope most of them will have enough free time know to try out new ideas and change the industry for good.

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