Tag Archives: washingtonpost.com

You said it, sister

From Gawker, The Plight of Print’s Lucky Ones:

Admittedly, complaining about your well-paying job at a time when a lot of very capable people are out of work altogether won’t engender any sympathy. But Q’s little booze-soaked soliloquy does raise a question that seems to weigh heavily on the minds of media folk of a certain demographic these days (those over the age of, say, 27, who have already spent 5-plus years toiling in the trenches at publications that are vastly different in scope and size than when they started). Namely: Where do we go from here?

Because right now, as the Summer of 2009 gives way to fall, the answer is pretty damn unclear.

The whole post is well worth a read, as it captures the broad industry wide malaise that’s got a strangle hold on this certain generation of journalists, those too young to call it quits on a career but not young enough to avoid wading into this swirling pool in the first place. I am, by the way, exactly 27.

I differ from the author of this post and from other woe-begotten journos in an important way: Even if I knew what was going to happen to the industry, I still don’t think that would have caused me to change majors in college or pursue another career path after graduation. But I would have probably went about it another way (and would have hoped my j school was on board). I also probably would have taken that interview I had for an internship at Washingtonpost.com a little bit more seriously.

I mean, they had a room full of free sodas in the office. That was a big selling point for them at the time. Who would’ve known that’s where the serious shit was happening?*

*we all should have known

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